"Dawson has become a literary hero, a testament to the power of perserverance."
– USA Today

 

"Life Is So Good is about character, soul and spirit...The pride in standing his ground is matched-maybe even exceeded-by the accomplishment of (George Dawson’s) hard-won education."
– The Washington Post
 
 richard glaubman  -
author

richardglaubman@gmail.com

Life Is So Good
In this remarkable book, George Dawson, a 103-year-old slave’s grandson who learned to read at age 98, reflects on his life and offers valuable lessons in living and a fresh, firsthand view of America during the twentieth century. Richard Glaubman captures Dawson's irresistible voice and view of the world, offering insights into humanity, history, hardships and happiness. From segregation and civil rights, to the wars and the presidents, to defining moments in history, George Dawson's description and assessment of the last century inspires readers with the message that has always sustained him: "Life is so good. I do believe it's getting better."

 


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http://www.csmonitor.com/2000/0217/p16s1.html

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/read20.shtml

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/life28.shtml

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html

http://www.hcoa.org/centenarians/george_dawson.htm

 


 

More Than a Book; a Story of Friendship
More Than a Book; a Story of Friendship recounts the story of what happened to George Dawson after his biography, Life is So Good was published. Dawson went on book tour and met people from all walks of life. At age one hundred and two, he traveled by airplane and visited New York, Chicago and Seattle. It was if he entered the twentieth century all at once. And just as George Dawson’s life changed, that was also true for his collaborator, Richard Glaubman. During their time together on their book tour, despite differences in age, race and education, the friendship begun in a humble kitchen in South Dallas grew even stronger.

 


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More Than a Book; a Story of Friendship, is a book for writers. The book details the real process of writing, querying, finding an agent and working with an editor and publisher. Beyond that, it reveals how in today’s literary marketplace, Glaubman and Dawson learned that a writer can’t just leave all the publicity for a book to his publicist, but has to take an active part in promoting the book.